Discrimination in Transportation

After establishment of the Fourteenth Amendment, all states in the U.S. are to be free from any form of racial segregation in interstate or intrastate transportation facilities.  Before the implementation of this amendment, racial segregation was part of state law to support the interstate commerce.

The federal statute provides that no person is permitted to act against another person by force or threat of force to injure, threaten, or interfere under the color of law.  Such action should not be based on race, color, religion, or national origin of that person.  It provides any person to travel or use any facility of interstate commerce, or use any vehicle, terminal, or facility of any common carrier by motor, rail, water, or air.  Violation of this is punishable by fine or imprisonment.

In state jurisdictions also, the civil rights statutes ensure that all persons are permitted to occupy the full and equal accommodations and privileges of public conveyances.


Inside Discrimination in Transportation